The exhibition Life Eternal is created by Nobel Prize Museum. It will open at Liljevalchs on 30 September 2022. The exhibition seeks to present different approaches to eternity. It looks at how we can prolong our own individual lives and build sustainable societies, and how to create meaning and narratives that help us see the value of thinking about our legacy to future generations.

Since time immemorial, mankind has contemplated the nature of time and the beginning and end of our personal and collective existence. These big and important questions have given rise to a myriad of ideas, dreams and myths. What we are seeing today is an amalgamation of myths and technology. While increasingly sophisticated techniques are being developed to prolong life, research shows that our very existence undermines the conditions that enable life on earth. So, the question of eternal life or final doom seems to be in our hands.

  • Artwork: Untitled (Carrier) by Jone Kvie will be shown in the exhibition. ©Jone Kvie/BONO. Photo: A. Sune Berg.

  • Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934), received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1906 for his research about the nervous system. Cajal was also a talented artist and made drawings of what he saw under the microscope. © Nobel Prize Outreach. Photo: Clément Morin

  • Artwork: Untitled (Carrier) by Jone Kvie will be shown in the exhibition. ©Jone Kvie/BONO. Photo: A. Sune Berg.

  • Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934), received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1906 for his research about the nervous system. Cajal was also a talented artist and made drawings of what he saw under the microscope. © Nobel Prize Outreach. Photo: Clément Morin

We want to create an adventure for visitors, an adventure that awakens wonder and a fascination for life. Blending science, art and cultural history, we want to highlight different facets of our lives, inspiring change and instilling hope for the future. The framework is the Nobel Prize, the Nobel laureates and their discoveries, works and peace efforts, which offer crucial perspectives on our lives and our future.

New artworks will be created by Mark Dion, Niki Lindroth von Bahr and Christian Partos.

  • An early X-ray picture taken by Wilhelm Röntgenof Albert von Kölliker's left hand. Photo: Public domain, Wikimedia Commons

  • An early X-ray picture taken by Wilhelm Röntgenof Albert von Kölliker's left hand. Photo: Public domain, Wikimedia Commons